Share this page

Fruit

Find out why these fruits are nutritious and how to make them delicious below.

 

 

Click here to view some video clips showing a selection of fruit preparation techniques.

Fruit

Fruits, nature’s homemade sweets, are one of the more versatile of food groups. The variety of colours, textures, aromas and tastes, from sweet to bitter, makes trying new fruit either on their own or with other foods an experience to relish. We should aim to have at least five portions of fruit and vegetables every day,  and fortunately there’s more than one way to enjoy them.

Most fruit can be enjoyed raw, stewed, baked or blended into a smoothie. Click on the fruit to find out how these can be prepared and try it today!

Fruit

Nutritious

Food facts

Cherries Rich in vitamin C. In season from June to September.
Guava Rich in vitamin C. Once sliced it is exposed to air, which leads to losses of vitamin C. Khelp to retain this vitamin by eating soon after preparing if you can.
Blackcurrants Rich in vitamin C. In season from July to September.
Strawberries Rich in vitamin C. In season from May to October.
Oranges Rich in vitamin C and a source of folate. Citrus fruits, like oranges, contain flavonoids, which are compounds which may help to protect cells in the body from damage.
Paw-paw (also known as Papaya) Rich in vitamin C and a source of vitamin A. Just half of this orange-coloured tropical fruit provides the recommended dietary allowance for vitamin C as well as counting towards 1 of your 5 A Day.
Figs, ready-to-eat Rich in fibre and a source of vitamin B6, iron and calcium. Figs can be eaten fresh or dried and the entire fruit is edible, even the skin.
Blueberries A source of vitamin C. In season from from May to October.
Elderberries - A fork can be used to strip the berries from their stalk and are great stewed or cooked with other fruits. Rich in vitamin C and a source of vitamin B6. In season in July. These black-coloured berries grow all over the British countryside .
Lemons Rich in vitamin C. Vitamin C increases the body’s absorption of vegetarian sources of iron, which are not as readily available as animal sources. Just add a squeeze of lemon juice.
Canteloupe melon Rich in vitamin C and vitamin A. It is the beta-carotene, which the body converts into viamin A, that gives it its’ characteristic orange colour.
Loganberries - Loganberries have a tart flavour and so are best stewed or cooked with other fruits. Rich in vitamin C and a source of folate. In season in July.
Apricots, ready-to-eat Rich in fibre and a source of iron. Dried apricots have a tart flavour which makes them a tasty addition to fruit compotes and savoury dishes.
Custard apple - Peel the skin and chop the flesh to serve in fruit salads and yogurt or cut the fruit in half and scoop out the flesh with a spoon. Rich in vitamin C. They have a light tan or green skin, which develops brown patches as it ripens.
Pomelo Rich in vitamin C. Those who don't like the sharp taste of grapefruit may prefer this citrus fruit instead, which is sweeter and less tangy.
Mangoes Rich in vitamin C. Aroma is a good way to indicate ripeness, as its’ skin colour doesn’t. A ripe mango has a perfumed aroma.
Kiwi fruit Rich in vitamin C. Unusual for a fruit, it is the chlorophyll which gives it its’ green colour.
Prunes Source of fibre, vitamin B6 and iron. Prunes are dried plums, great in both sweet and savoury dishes.
Raspberries Rich in vitamin C and source a of folate. In season from April to November.
Redcurrants Rich in vitamin C. In season from July to September.
Clementines Rich in vitamin C. These are the smallest of the tangerines and contain no pips, making it a popular choice on the go.