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Food glossary

Cauliflower

Cauliflower

A member of the cabbage family, cauliflower is often overcooked and its flavour spoilt, but when cooked until just tender it is very tasty. Choose cauliflower with a clean white head that is free of blemishes and look for crisp, green outer leaves. Available all year.

Uses: Cooked cauliflower can be used in the classic cauliflower cheese, served as an accompanying vegetable or included in soups. It is also popular in chutneys and piccalilli. Raw cauliflower can be used in salads or as a crudité for dips.

To store: Keep in the fridge for up to 1 week.

To prepare: Trim the outer green leaves from the cauliflower (these can be cooked like cabbage or used in soup) and divide the head into large florets. Wash thoroughly before using.

To cook: Steam or boil the florets in 3 to 5cm of water for 5 to 10 minutes or until just tender, add 1 tsp of lemon juice to the water to enhance the white colour. Drain well before serving and season with black pepper.

Romanesco caulifower

Romanesco cauliflower differs from traditional cauliflower in that it is pale lime in colour rather than creamy white. It has a milder, sweeter flavour than the white variety and is best eaten when the heads are small.

Uses: Romanesco cauliflower can be eaten raw or cooked and used in the same way as white cauliflower try serving a mixture of the 2 for a change.

To store: Keep in the fridge for up to 1 week.

To prepare: Trim the outer green leaves from the cauliflower (these can be cooked like cabbage or used in soup) and divide the head into large florets. Wash thoroughly before using.

To cook: Steam or boil the florets in 3 to 5cm of water for 5 to 10 minutes or until just tender, add 1 tsp of lemon juice to the water to enhance the white colour. Drain well before serving and season with black pepper.