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    Garlicky chard & poached eggs on toast

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    Garlicky chard & poached eggs on toast

    • Preparation time: 10 minutes
    • Cooking time: 15 minutes
    • Total time: 25 minutes 25 minutes

    Serves: 2

    Ingredients

    200g pack Swiss chard
    1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus a little extra to drizzle
    1 echalion shallot, halved and thinly sliced
    2 cloves garlic, sliced Pinch dried chilli flakes
    ½ small lemon, juice 1 tbsp
    Oatly! Creamy Oat Fraiche
    2 British Blacktail Free Range Medium Eggs
    2 large slices (about 75g each) seeded sourdough, toasted

    Method

    1. Rinse the chard, then separate the stalks and leaves. Slice any thicker stalks lengthways and into shorter pieces, then shred the leaves. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat. Add the chard stalks, shallot, garlic and a pinch of salt and sweat for 5 minutes, or until softened and glossy. Meanwhile, bring a small pan of water to a low simmer, ready to poach the eggs.

    2. Stir the chilli flakes into the chard mixture, then add the shredded chard leaves. Cover with a lid and leave to wilt for 2 minutes. Uncover, squeeze in the lemon juice and stir over the heat for a final minute. Take off the heat, stir in the oat fraiche and season with black pepper.

    3. Poach the eggs in the pan of just-simmering water for 3-4 minutes, until the whites are set but the yolks are still soft. Remove and drain with a slotted spoon, then blot dry on kitchen paper. Arrange the toasted sourdough on plates, spoon over the chard and top each with a poached egg and a little more freshly ground black pepper.

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    Cook’s tip The fresher the eggs, the better they are for poaching. As eggs age, the whites tend to thin out – which is why older eggs will spread out and have lots of wispy bits when poached. Eggs are a rich source of protein, which contributes to bone and muscle maintenance, and contain all the essential amino acids that the body cannot produce itself. 

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