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Food glossary

Apricot

Apricot

Not widely known in Europe until the 15th century. These yellow to pale orange fruits have a velvety skin. They are available from May to September. As a rule the stronger the apricot colour, the sweeter the fruit. Apricots are a rich source of vitamin A. Canned, halved apricots are also available.

Uses:
Flans, tarts, creams, ice cream, fool, compôte, mousse, soufflé, crumble, crème brûlée or as a preserve.

To store:
Unripe apricots should be kept at room temperature. When ripe place in the fridge and use within 3 days.

To prepare:
Wash the apricots, half them and discard the stone. If not to be used immediately the cut surfaces can be brushed with lemon juice to prevent browning. To skin an apricot, cover with boiling water for 30 seconds, plunge into cold water and dry before pulling off the skin.

To cook:
Wash, halve and stone some fresh apricots. Simmer in a little water until tender and then add sugar to taste. For added flavour add thinly peeled lemon zest to the apricots.

Semi-dried apricots

These apricots are carefully selected fruit that are ready-to-eat with no need to soak. They are cleaned, washed and blanched making them soft and succulent. They are then foil packed to seal in the flavour.

Uses:
Ideal as a snack food or in children's lunch boxes or in picnics. Can be chopped and included in cake or dessert recipes. In savoury dishes for stuffings, sauces and in salads.

To store:
Store in a cool, dry place. Keep in an airtight container after opening.