Share this page

Food glossary

Spinach

Spinach

These dark green leaves were made famous by Popeye in the 1930s but they have been a popular choice for centuries, especially in Italy where dishes called Florentine have a high spinach content. Look for clean dark green leaves and reject any that are yellow, wilting or damaged. Spinach reduces dramatically when cooked - a 450g bag may look big, but it will only serve two.

Uses: In pasta sauces, on pizzas, in stuffing and fillings. It goes well with cheese and egg dishes.
Baby leaf spinach can be eaten raw in salads.

To store: Keep in the fridge for 2-3 days.

To prepare: Remove any large stalks then rinse thoroughly in a colander, making sure any excess water is removed from the leaves.

To cook: Place the leaves in a pan and cook over a low heat for 4-5 minutes, there is no need to add any extra water. When the spinach is tender, press any remaining liquid out with the back of a spoon and drain thoroughly.