Share this page

Food Glossary

Truffles

Truffles

Confectionary

These are small spherical sweets made from a rich chocolate paste, known as ganache, coated in chocolate powder, plain, milk or white chocolate or finely chopped nuts. The chocolate paste may be flavoured with a variety of ingredients, ranging from alcohol such as rum or brandy to coffee, or chopped dried fruits and nuts. A variety of truffles are available from Waitrose including Waitrose truffle assortment (180g), an assortment of plain, white, milk, brandy and orange and Cointreau flavoured truffles; Waitrose milk chocolate Belgian truffles (200g), truffle centres coated with Belgian milk chocolate flakes and Prestat marc de champagne truffles (275g).

Uses: Serve a selection of truffles after dinner with coffee.

To store: Keep in a cool, dark, dry place and eat by the sell by date.

Fungus

A prized delicacy all over the world, truffles are a type of fungus which grow underground. They are used in very small quantities and add a distinctive aroma and flavour to a variety of savoury dishes. Black and white truffles are available and are found mainly in France, Italy and Spain where they are a popular, but costly, ingredient. Truffles remain well underground and although experts can detect where they are growing, trained animals usually pigs or dogs, with their keen sense of smell are often employed to root them out. Waitrose sell 30g jars of whole Urbani Black Summer Truffles in truffle juice.

Uses: Truffles can be included in a range of dishes. They can be sliced and added to mayonnaise to top canap├ęs or serve with hard-boiled quails eggs. Or sprinkle a little finely grated truffle over a warm potato salad. Chopped truffles also add a delicious flavour to salad dressings.

To store: Keep jars of truffles in a cool, dark place and consume by the best before date.

To prepare: Drain the truffles, reserving the juice and finely grate or slice to include in recipes. The juice can be added to mayonnaise or salad dressing.